Loading...
You are here:  Home  >  Education  >  Current Article

Preparing High School Students For The Next Step

 August 27, 2014  /  Comments Off on Preparing High School Students For The Next Step

    Print       Email

For many high school students, graduation couldn’t come any faster. They can’t wait to be done with their high school career, and to enjoy the endless amounts of possibilities that summer has to offer them. For those that are planning on moving a step further with attending a college in the fall—we have one thing to question: are they prepared for what their college is going to ask of them?

For me, high school was a breeze. You have your group of friends and you do the bare minimum that is asked of you. You pass your classes, walk the stage to get your diploma, and walk out the door as happy as a clam. But, did your high school prepare you for your next educational step?

I know mine sure didn’t.

Sure, high school teachers tell you that college will be harder. They tell you that you’re going to have to work harder and apply more of your knowledge to different aspects of your studies. But what they didn’t do is act on it.

Financial Plans

One major part of going to college is the steps and advances you need to take in applying to them. High schools should encourage students to remember deadlines and fees that are assessed when applying for their college. I know that with my school, I was left in the dark with a lot of this information.

High schools should present a research or educational poster of the major colleges surrounding them for the student body to see—give them a ballpark idea of when their deadlines are for submission, what they require for their application (fees, essays, references, etc.), and what financial support is offered through their school.

Preparing High School Students For The Next Step

Another great idea would be to offer SAT/ACT help. Colleges and universities make this a requirement upon applying. Letting students know that they have help through the school with tutoring and enhancing testing skills, can be a major factor in their college career path.

Scholarships, financial aid and student loans should be a major part of the discussion, especially for the seniors in high school. Let them know what is being offered, and how to start establishing scholarship entries.

Curriculum

Teachers should start informing their students as early as freshman year of what is to be expected of them in college. Having them start to consider what they want to do after high school this early can help them establish the certain steps that need to take place.

In this day and age, most of the way students are being taught is by having them drown in a sea of facts, statistics, quotes—you name it—and hoping they memorize them. This is not a true way of learning—remembering certain facts, quotes, or equations for a test, and then throwing it out of your mind the next day—is not the way to retain and grow as a student.

With most college classes, the Professors expect you to have a conversation with them. Sit amongst your peers and share the knowledge and information you know, and discuss. This is the true way of learning, and the true way of growing as an individual. High school teachers should try and focus more on the aspect of discussion in their classroom, more than just a speed through lecture on a PowerPoint, and hoping they’re retaining it.

Support

For a final suggestion, teachers and high schools should remind students that they are more than welcome to ask questions about college; how to apply, what is expected, and in turn, why it’s beneficial. Having a good support system for students to achieve the most they possibly can, can greatly influence their willingness to learn, and their willingness to want to progress to that next level.

All in all, college and high school are vastly different. High schools aren’t adjusting their students for the next big step, and they need to implement structures and designs to do so. Helping students learn the financial side of college, deadlines, requirements with standardized testing, and an open discussion forum, can increasingly change the way they are prepared and ready for, for college.

    Print       Email

You might also like...

5 Ways Hiring A Tutor Can Help Your Child

Read More →